WIP Issues

  • Introduction: the ODUNDE African American festival, its roots and relations. By Lois Fernandez and Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • An ODUNDE portfolio: photographer's statement. By Thomas B. Morton, p. 3
  • Origins: why we shall not be moved. By Lois Fernandez, pp. 4-5
  • Testimonies. Excerpts from recorded interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 6-7
  • "The right to assemble:" African American uses of public space. By Karen Buchholz, pp. 8-9
  • The drum preferred. By Jerrily McGregory, pp.10-13
  • Cultural incubation: Sydney King's dance school and its legacies. By Karen Warrington, pp. 14-15

 

  • Boun pi mai: customs of the Lao New Year. By Chanthavy Thamphya and Jennifer Michael, pp. 2-3
  • "The heart lasts longer than appearances:" Hmong kwv txhiaj (courting song) at New Years. By Yang Blianghheng Lo, Pang Xiong Sirirathasuk and Jennifer Michael, with assistance from T-Bee Lo. Khue Vang and Chakaphong Sirirathasuk, pp. 4-6
  • New Year issues. By Debora Kodish, p.7
  • Banh Tet: New Year's cakes and their meanings [Vietnamese New Year traditions]. By Trinh Dang and Jennifer Michael, pp. 8-9
  • Cutoms of Vietnamese New Year, Tet Nguyen-Dan. By Cuong Nhu Pham, translated by Trinh Dang, pp. 10-11
  • A brief history of Chol Chhnam, Cambodian New Years celebrations in Philadelphia. By Leendavy Koung, pp. 12-14
  • News, p. 15

 

  • Translating the truth, translating the law: the case of Commonwealth v. Thuy. By Bill Westerman, pp. 2-3
  • Food isn't a meal unless rice is served: exploring Cambodian foodways. By Jennifer Michael, Leendavy Koung and Theany Sam, pp. 4-6
  • Gospel in and out of the African community. By John W. Roberts, pp. 6-7
  • Grants workshop and news about funding for last year's attendees, pp. 8-9
  • Publications, kudos and news, pp. 10-11
  • Columbus, myth and 500 years of resistance and survival. By Bill Westerman and Debora Kodish, pp. 2-3
  • Looking at photographs by Thomas B. Morton. By Cheryl McClenney-Brooker, Thora Jacobson and Debora Kodish, pp. 4-9
  • Photographer's statement. By Thomas B. Morton, pp. 10-11
  • From Angkor Wat to MTV: the handmade work of a Cambodian videographer. By Bill Westerman, pp. 12-13
  • The story of the greedy family. By Leendavy Koung, pp. 14-5
  • News, p. 15
  • Truths of ODUNDE [community festival]. By Gerald L. Davis, pp. 2-3
  • "To put kind feeelings in the heart:" the paintings of Eang Mao [Khmer artist]. By William Westerman. pp. 4-5
  • The story of the wolf and the shrimp. Recorded and edited by Leendavy Koung, pp. 6-7
  • On folklore and multiculturalism. By Debora Kodish, pp. 8-9
  • News, pp. 10-11
  • "You can't take the country out of a man:" Furman Humphrey and the African American tradition of woodcarving. By Jack L. Lindsey, pp. 2-5
  • "Bamboo shoots grow up to be bamboo:" documenting Cambodian traditions. By Bill Westerman, pp. 6-7
  • Why people think folk arts are safe (and why they aren't). By Debora Kodish, pp. 8-9
  • Announcing a new artist aid program for traditional artists, p. 10
  • Upcoming events, p. 11

OUT OF PRINT

  • Passing on traditions: sixteen master folk artists. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • Introduction: common ground and cultural diversity. By Debora Kodish and Catherine Jacobs, p. 3
  • Sharing a legacy
  • Learning is a lifelong process: Aguedo Beltran, p. 4 [Puerto Rican cuatro-maker]; Stolen threads: Eudokia Sorochaniuk, p. 4 [Ukranian Hutsul weaver]; "I will be responsible for his learning:" Nykola Pawliuk, p. 5 [Ukrainian hutsul leatherworker]; Searching out others: Judith Civan, p. 5 [English bobbin laceworker]
  • Refining and re-finding traditions
  • Maintaining a cultural art: Terrence Cameron, p. 6 [Trinidadian steel pan-maker]; Finding one's roots: John Roussos, p. 6 [Greek santouri musician];
  • Gathering regional traditions: Anna Halmay, Teofila Malnychuk and Stefania Shumsky Meyer, pp. 6-7 [Ukrainian embroidery and beadwork]; Weaving past into present: Elisabeth Jonsson Brown, p. 7 [Swedish weaver]
  • A matter of cultural survival
  • Treasured symbols: Bronius Krokys, p. 8 [Lithuanian folksong]; Overcoming obstacles: Peang Koung, p. 8-9 [Khmer musical instrument-maker]; Cultivating wisdom: Blanche Epps, p. 9 [African American gardener]; Fabrics of culture: Pang Xiong Sirirathasuk, p. 9-10 [Hmong needleworker]
  • Changing tides of appreciation
  • Preserving miniature theater: Hal Taylor, p. 10 [European marionette-maker]; Expanding expressive possibilities: LaVaughn Robinson, p. 10-11 [African American tap dancer]
  • Acknowledgements, p.11

OUT OF PRINT

 

  • From the director. By Debora Kodish, p. 1
  • Apsaras in Philadelphia: keeping Khmer court dance alive. By Debora Kodish, pp. 2-3
  • "We sang all the time:" reviving Lithuanian folksongs. By Debora Kodish, pp. 4-5, 7
  • News, p. 5-7
  • Myer Adler: adventures in creative recycling [about a Jewish dreydl and grogger-maker]. By Catherine Jacobs, pp. 6-7
  • From the director. By Debora Kodish, p. 1
  • Folklore everywhere: Philadelphia Folklore Month a rousing success. pp. 2-3
  • Pennsylvania German folk arts: dowry, quilts and marriage gifts. By Jack L. Lindsey, pp. 4-5
  • African American holiday tradition in Philadelphia [Kwanzaa]. By Jerrilyn McGregory, pp. 5, 7
  • Events, pp. 6-7

 

  • From the director. By Debora Kodish, p. 1
  • "How to do what can't be done:" Bobby Pandola's mummers' costumes. By Dorothy Noyes and Jan Greenberg, pp. 2-3
  • A master lawyer's legend: Cecil B. Moore in the Philadelphia criminal courts. By Samuel Schrager, pp. 4-5
  • Philadelphia Folklore Month, p. 5, 7
  • The life and times of a puppeteer [about Hal Taylor]. By Joan Gross, p. 6
  • Philadelphia Folklore Project news, p. 7, 8