WIP Issues

  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • Rennie Harris: "Dancing the art of living." Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Joan Huckstep, pp. 3-5
  • Elaine Hoffman Watts: "Girls don't play drums." Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 6-7, 24
  • "My father never played for me:" Joe Borock. By Jackie Borock, pp. 8-9, 25
  • Kiyoshi Kuromiya: "Building up our courage and our experience" [activists interviews]. Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Teresa Jaynes, pp. 10-13
  • Pang Xiong Sirirathasuk Sikoun: "You only have to worry about bears and tigers" [Hmong artist experiences]. Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Deborah Wei, pp. 14-17, 25
  • Phua Xiong: "I had a different name when I was born..." [Hmong experiences]. Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Deborah Wei, pp. 18-21
  • Self-taught painters from the PFP collection [Aaron Birnbaum, Floretta Emma Warfel, Ken Grimes]. By Jack L. Lindsey, pp. 22-23
  • Artists in Exile: a documentary photography exhibition by Thomas B. Morton. By Debora Kodish, Mogauwane Mahoele, and others. From interviews with Teresa Jaynes and Debora Kodish. pp. 27-28
  • Traveling exhibitions and books, pp. 29-30
  • Upcoming events, p. 31
  • From the director. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • Here comes Philly Dance Africa [artist biographies]. By Stacey Ford and Debora Kodish, pp. 3-9
  • Africa's new traditional dancing. By Katrina Hazzard-Donald, pp. 10-11
  • "Philadelphia, Muntiye!" (Listen up, Philadelphia!): Nii Armah Hammond is talking [Ga drummer]. By Elizabeth Sayre, pp. 12-13, 23
  • Die Jess Sah Bi, a very modern traditionalist [Guro kolon player]. By Elizabeth Sayre, pp. 14-17
  • Personal reflections on Haitian music. By Lois Wilcken and Frisner Augustin, pp. 18-19
  • Bill and Miriam Crawford: "Freedom was my badge" [activists interviews]. Recorded and transcribed by Teresa Jaynes, pp. 20-22
  • A gathering of warriors (The steel drum and our children). By Germaine Ingram, pp. 24-25
  • Upcoming events, p. 26
  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • Happy 10th birthday: where were you in January 1987? By Debora Kodish, p. 3-9
  • Painted women: Rashmi Jhaveri's henna arts. By Teresa Jaynes, pp. 10-13
  • Carved birds and flowers: Chia Kue's edible art. By Teresa Jaynes, pp. 14-15
  • "I do not do recitals:" Ione Nash, dancer and teacher. By Debora Kodish, pp. 16-17
  • "Where there is music, there is dance:" African social dance in Philadelphia. By Stacey E. Ford, pp. 18-19, 27
  • "Tell the story to the children:" William Still and the Still family reunion. By William Westerman, pp. 20-23
  • Facing down a death squad: a labor organizer in Honduras [activists interviews]. Excerpts from interviews with Mike Finley and Denys Everingham, by Teresa Jaynes, pp. 24-26
  • Exhibitions and books, pp. 28-29
  • Upcoming events, p. 30

 

  • Who defines Indian artists? Background and some considerations. By Troy Richardson, pp. 2-5
  • Native women singers / history. By Pura Fe, pp. 6-7
  • Negotiating pitfalls and possibilities: presenting folk arts in the schools. By Debora Kodish and William Westerman, pp. 8-11
  • "I don't care to hide anything:" Chamroeun Yin [Cambodian dancer]. Transcribed from interviews by Prolung Khan Ngin, edited by Chiny Ky and Debora Kodish, pp. 12-15
  • "Why do you guys dance like that?" conversations with Asian American teenagers. Edited from interviews by Catzie Vilayphonh, Ty Sao, and René Marquez, with Debbie Wei, Teresa Jaynes and Debora Kodish, pp. 16-19
  • Some Cambodian women weavers in Philadelphia. By Prolung Ngin based on interviews by herself and Jennifer Harris , pp. 20-21
  • Announcing traveling folklife exhibitions, pp. 22-23
  • Calendar of events, p. 23
  • From the editor / to our readers. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • Remembering Leab Lenorra Koung (1976-1996). By Debora Kodish, p. 3
  • "My paintings will not die:" Frito Bastien, Haitian artist in exile. By Jennifer Michael, pp. 4-7
  • "An actress since I was born:" Chayale Ash, Yiddish theater artist. By Janice Cohen and Debora Kodish, pp. 8-9
  • "Singing is like freedom of speech:" Hawa Moore, Liberian performing artist. By Jennifer Michael, pp. 10-13
  • Cambodian folk tales, as told by local Philadelphia storytellers. By Meas Chea, Bory Kouch, Chiny Ky, Touch San and Chamroeun Yin, edited by Chiny Ky ands Debora Kodish, pp. 14-23
  • "Plenty of Good Women Dancers" exhibit opens, pp. 24-25
  • Our new children's book punctures stereotypes, pp. 26-27
  • Traveling exhibitions, and books, pp. 28-29
  • Upcoming events, p. 30
  • Art Happens Here: an introduction. By Debora Kodish and Teresa Jaynes, pp. 2-3
  • "You have completed a circle:" Baba Crowder in Ghana [African American percussionist]. By Baba Ibikunle Bey and Debora Kodish, pp. 4-5
  • "All these things are linked:" Mogauwane Mahloele [South African musician]. By Teresa Jaynes, pp. 6-7
  • Documenting graffiti. By Sandra Andino, pp. 8-9, 15
  • Keep it real. By Dan Polanco, pp. 10, 15
  • Talking about graffiti: excerpts from a discussion at Taller Puertorriqueno. Transcribed from multiple speakers, pp. 16-19
  • "Believe me, it was a cultural haven at the time:" coming up in Point Breeze. Transcribed from multiple speakers, pp. 2-21
  • Odunde: twenty years on South Street [African American community festival]. Transcribed from multiple speakers and edited by Alyson Littman, pp. 22-23
  • Setting the record straight: an introduction to "Stepping in Time." By Germaine Ingram and Debora Kodish, pp. 2-3 [revised from 7:2/3 (1994) 8-13]
  • Performers' biographies, pp. 4-13
  • Some beginnings and breaks: stories from virtuoso veteran dancers. Excerpts from transcribed interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 14-17 [revised from 6:3/7:1 (1993) 2-5]
  • "Just playin' from the heart:" Henry Meadows and the rhythms of South Philadelphia. Excerpts from transcribed interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 18-20
  • "Not everyone can be in a show:" John Hart. Excerpts from transcribed interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, p. 21
  • "The real untold stories of tap:" African American women dancers. By Germaine Ingram and Debora Kodish, pp. 22-27 [revised from 7:2/3 (1994) 8-13]
  • "Staging the shows, all the way down the line:" Hortense Allen Jordan and Libby Spencer. Excerpts from transcribed interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 28-31
  • "Tryin' to get my knowledge together:" Women entertainers in the business and on the road. Excerpts from transcribed interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 32-37
  • "You had your own style:" tricks of the tap dance trade and how you learned them. Excerpts from transcribed interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 38-41 [same as 8:1 (1994) 12-17]
  • Stepping in Time: credits, p. 42

 

  • "We are speaking for those ancestors whose stories were not allowed to be heard:" storyteller Charlotte Blake Alston. By Teresa Jaynes and Debora Kodish, pp. 2-3
  • "I've raised more children than I've brought into the world:" culture and community in West Philadelphia. By Teresa Jaynes, pp. 4-7
  • Gospel music from the grassroots. By Cassandra Graves, pp. 8-11
  • Coming up dancing: tricks of the tap dance trade and how you learned them. Excerpts from transcribed interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 12-17
  • "When they hit the light, they shone like diamonds:" memories of lakhon bassac Cambodian folk opera]. Excerpts from interview with Siden Veal, recorded by Bill Westerman, pp. 18-19
  • The story of Neang Domra and Preah Mohaosot. By Koung Paeng, as told to Leendavy Koung
  • Kai Akwei-Bey, photographer, p. 22
  • Upcoming events, news, and new publications, p. 23
  • From hucklebuck to hip-hop: ODUNDE goes dancing. By Lois Fernandez and Debora Kodish, pp. 2-3
  • Tell us how you dance..., p. 3
  • "I don't ever remember a time when we didn't dance:" excerpts from interviews, pp. 4-7
  • "The real untold stories of tap:" African American women dancers. By Germaine Ingram and Debora Kodish, pp. 8-13
  • African dance in Philadelphia. By Benita Binta Brown, pp. 14-19
  • "There's nobody who's ever lived on the face of this earth who wasn't at one time enslaved:" Lee Carter's Underground Railroad paintings. By Bill Westerman, pp. 20-23
  • Recognizing cultural barriers to justice in greater Philadelphia. By William Westerman, pp. 24-26
  • News, pp. 26-27

OUT OF PRINT

  • Some beginnings and breaks: first notes from the Philadelphia Tap Initiative. By Debora Kodish, pp. 2-5
  • Ethnographic perspectives on a Cambodian arts class in Philadelphia. By Bill Westerman, pp. 6-9
  • Behind the letter of the law: culture and the work of the public defender. By Bill Westerman, pp. 10-13
  • Samuel Yellin Metalworks: a folklife perspective on a preservation project. By Michael J. Chiarappa and Ralph Muldrow, pp. 14-15
  • Community-based rhythms against violence: African American marching units in Philadelphia. By Benita Binta Brown with Jennnifer Michael, pp. 16-21
  • Hal Taylor, 1921-1993: a remembrance. By Karen Buchholz, pp. 22-23