WIP Issues

 

  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 3
  • Imagining Louise Madison: remembering African American women dancers. By Germaine Ingram, p. 4
  • Self-knowledge. By Kathryn L. Morgan, p. 8
  • Waking up the people. By Linda Goss, p. 10
  • Telling stories my whole life. By Thelma Shelton Robinson, p. 12
  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 3
  • "I choose to stay here." By Debora Kodish and members of Community Leadership Institute, p. 4
  • "We are here to make changes:" pleñero Joaquin Rivera. By Elizabeth Sayre, p. 8
  • Acrobatics and freedom: sepak takraw in a South Philadelphia park. By Bill Westerman, p. 10
  • The dance is an offering: Ollin Yolitzli Calmecac. By Kay Turner, p. 12
  • We shall not be moved: Thomas B. Morton's photographs of 30 years of ODUNDE. p. 14
  • Arabic song, flamenco footwork: Herencia Arabe . By Toni Shapiro-Phim, p. 18
  • Folk arts and multicultural education: notes on a folklore project program. By Toni Shapiro-Phim, p. 22

 

  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 3
  • "Walking on solid ground" and the history of Philadelphia's Chinatown. By Debora Kodish, p. 4
  • Reflections on the serpent's tail. By Toni Shapiro-Phim, p. 8
  • Kulu Mele: legacy and transnational practice. By Barbara L. Hampton, p. 12
  • Making music: Mogauwane Mahloele, Tito Rubio, John Wilkie. Edited by Toni Shapiro-Phim, p. 16
  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 3
  • About the Women's Music Project. By Toni Shapiro-Phim, p. 4
  • The drum was my introduction to my life: Nana Korantemaa Ayeboafo. By Elizabeth Sayre, p. 8
  • This is not a dress rehearsal: NANIKHA, p. 12
  • Knocking on the spirit door. By Omomola Iyabunmi, p. 16
  • Cooking up a mess of agit-prop. By Eric Joselyn, p. 18
  • Walking on solid ground. By Shuyuan Li, p. 24
  • We shall not be moved. By Lois Fernandez, p. 28
  • Total praise: preserving the hymn singing tradition. By Shawn P. Saunders, p. 30
  • Esta en mis venas: three latina musicians. By Elizabeth Sayre, p. 32
  • From the editors. By Debora Kodish and Toni Shapiro-Phim , p. 3
  • Welcome. By Samuel Quartey, p. 4
  • A Ga outdooring. By Barbara L. Hampton, p. 6
  • Ione Nash and Kule Mele African Dance Ensemble. By Katrina Hazzard-Donald, p. 10
  • To be young, gifted and Black. By Shawn P. Saunders, p. 14
  • African dance. By Kariamu Welsh, p. 16
  • From the guest editor. Dance journeys: movement vs. silence. By Toni Shapiro-Phim , p. 3
  • As the chaos of the world is knocking on our door: an interview with Matthew Hart of Spiral Q Puppet Theater. By Toni-Shapiro-Phim, p, 4
  • A procession for the new year. [Khmer trot procession in South Philadelphia] By Toni Shapiro-Phim, p. 8
  • On flamenco. By Anna Rubio, p. 12
  • Aqui Estoy. By Toni Shapiro-Phim, p. 14
  • Kormassa Bobo [Liberian dancer]. By Cory W. Thorne, p. 16
  • Reconnecting with tradition [African American social dance]. By Shawn P. Saunders, p. 18
  • Lithuanian folk arts journey. By Jen Cox, p. 20
  • PFP traveling exhibitions and books, p. 28
  • Look forward and carry on the past order form, p. 30
  • From the editors. By Debora Kodish and Deborah Wei , p. 3
  • Sites of struggle: bringing folklore and social change into the classroom. By Debora Kodish and Debora Wei, p. 5
  • I didn't dance after I left Changsha. By Oliver Nie, p. 10
  • The story of Ki-Wook Kim. By Ju-Yeon Ryu, p. 14
  • Chinatown without lion dancers would be a community filled with regret. By Sifu Cheung Shu Pui, p. 18
  • The deep void in my heart has been filled: Beijing Opera in Philadelphia. By Juan Xu, p. 24
  • You cannot lose your spirit. By Leendavy Koung, p. 26
  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • Blood Stains. By William Westerman, pp. 3-5, 28
  • Reclaiming a tradition: mid-autumn festival in Philadelphia's Chinatown. By Deborah Wei, pp. 6-7, 26-27
  • La Virgen de Guadalupe and stuggles for justice in Chester County. By Miguel Diaz-Barriga and Luis Tlaseca, pp. 8-9, 27
  • Folk Arts of Social Change: excepts from an exhibition. Exhibition text panels, photographs and labels, curated by Teresa Jaynes, pp. 10-21
  • Folk Arts of Social Change: curator's selection. Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Teresa Jaynes, pp. 22-25, 27-29
  • Traveling exhibitions, pp. 30-31
  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • Caribbean folk artists in Philadelphia [Edwin Arocho, mask maker; Terrence Cameron, steel drum-maker; Confesor Melendez, cuatro-maker]. By Elizabeth Sayre, pp. 3-7
  • Bending wire in Philadelphia: the carnival arts of Bobby DeSouza and Cecil Griffith. By Philip Scher, pp. 8-9, 22
  • "To speak up and tell the truth": interview with Jean Hunt [activist interviews]
  • Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Teresa Jaynes, pp. 10-13, 20-21
  • Help us build "Folk Arts of Social Change," pp. 14-15
  • David Acosta: "Change was in the air" [activist interviews]. Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Teresa Jaynes, pp.16-19, 23-24
  • PFP videos, traveling exhibitions and books, pp. 25-27

 

  • From the director. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • "African dance, that's my job:" Congolese dancers and drummers in Philadelphia. By Elizabeth Sayre, pp. 3-5, 26-27
  • Bertha Waters and her daughters: "Our children told us to put our feet where our mouth was!" [activists interviews]. Excerpts from interviews with Bertha Water, Cynthia Waters-Spaulding and Linda Richardson by Teresa Jaynes, pp. 6-9, 18-19, 22-23
  • Nigerian music and dance: Twins 7-7 of Nigeria. By Stacey Ford and Elizabeth Sayre, pp. 10-11
  • Blanche Epps' memory dolls. Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 12-13, 20
  • Learning the rhythms of life [about African dance]. Excerpts from a recorded discussion by Kwesi Yankah and Katrina Hazzard-Donald, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 14-17, 21
  • Traveling exhibitions and books, pp. 24-25