In the Field

Travel around Philadelphia with PFP to learn about how folk arts are at work strengthening our communities.

Current Initiatives

Tibetans have been living in Philadelphia since the 1980s, but their families, and thousands before them, had been uprooted decades earlier as a result of the Chinese military’s occupation of Tibet that had started way back in 1949, and China’s subsequent repression of Tibetan cultural and political life. Today, Tibetans in our area number around 150.

The Liberian Women's Chorus for Change brings the power of Liberian traditional song to the forefront of efforts to make communities safe and strong. Composed of renowned singers and dancers from Liberia -- Fatu Gayflor, Marie Nyenabo, Zaye Tete, and Tokay Tomah -- the Chorus inspires awareness and dialogue about domestic violence and other concerns of Philadelphia-area Liberian immigrants.

Past Initiatives

Local Knowledge Project: Folklore and Self-Knowledge. Here are a series of bibliographies, articles and links related to PFP's 2005 project exploring ways that individuals and communities preserve critical and alternative understandings.

(February 1, 2005) The Philadelphia Folklore Project announces, in honor of ODUNDE's 30th Anniversary and Art Sanctuary's 21st Annual Celebration of Black Writing, an afternoon gathering of folklorists and storytellers, sharing stories and conversation.

September 21, 2007. Philadelphia, PA - The Philadelphia Folklore Project presents tap dancers Germaine Ingram and Ensemble, and Flamenco del Encuentro: two percussive dance ensembles. Two premieres will be performed in a dance concert on Saturday, December 8th at the Painted Bride Art Centerin Philadelphia (8:00 PM: $20).

"Moving chronicle of one family's life in music. A rare glimpse, touched with humor, of how a musical tradition was held in trust." - Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett

"Drummer Elaine Hoffman Watts is still smoothly rolling on a snare in her eighth decade." - David Stampone, Philadelphia Inquirer